Dear Millennial, You May Not Like Your Job, But….

Dear Millennial, You May Not Like Your Job, But….

curzonblog2_001Most people will have at least one job that can be described in one word – “awful.” Maybe the workload wasn’t what they told you it would be when you interviewed for the position. Maybe a colleague, or five, was (were) a nightmare to work with. Or maybe you just realized that you do not like that particular role. In any case, you’re looking for a new job and you will be glad to be gone – good riddance to it.

Except, don’t say that last part out loud in an interview, no matter how strongly you feel it.

When talking about why we left a past position some of us don’t think twice before dishing out the dirt. But Hiring Managers tend not to like it. Instead of feeling like they’re getting the inside scoop, they often wonder if it will be their company you’re ‘ragging on’ next. And unfortunately that usually overshadows the rest of the interview, no matter how awesome you are.

So, here are some tips on how to better phrase things and rock that interview. To start, don’t be negative. Simple, but effective. Try our “professional translator:”

Instead of saying “People quit that place left and right.” Try “I’ve had experience working with a range of work-styles.”
• “My old supervisor was overbearing and I hated being micromanaged.” versus “I can keep myself on task.”
• “My co-workers were lazy so I ended up doing most of the work.” versus “I can handle multiple on-going projects.”
• “They wouldn’t give me a raise.” versus “I’m looking for an opportunity with more room for growth.”
Once you run something through the “professional translator”, take it a step further by adding something positive.
• “I’ve had experience working with and can accommodate a wide range of work styles.”
• “I am good at keeping myself on task and am detail oriented.”
• “I can handle multiple on-going projects and have great time management skills.”
• “I’m looking for an opportunity with more room for growth.” (That one rarely needs an elaboration as most interviewers will understand exactly what you mean.)
And for the coup de grâce, use it as an opportunity to showcase your skills.
• “I’ve had experience working with and can accommodate a wide range of work-styles. In my past role one of the challenges was a high turnover rate. I took it as an opportunity to sharpen my communication and organizational skills so that I can efficiently bring people up to speed without losing momentum on projects.”
• “I am good at keeping myself on task and am detail oriented. In my previous role I kept a log of relevant progress and shared it with my supervisor at scheduled intervals. This reduced the amount of meetings by half, which freed up her/his time and allowed me to consistently finish projects ahead of deadline.”
• “I can handle multiple on-going projects and have great time management skills. In my last position I typically juggled two to four larger projects at a time while still keeping on top of my day to day duties. Because of this and a willingness to lend an extra hand, my team considered me to be the go-to person.”
BOOM, you just took yourself from “average applicant” to “well-spoken wonder.” It should go without saying, but make sure you can back up your brag. If you follow these tips and keep the focus on your positive contributions, interviewers will be hard pressed not to be impressed.
Congratulations on that new job, yes, the one you’re going to get very soon because you know how to talk about the “challenging” one you have now.
Have your own on clever way of phrasing things in an interview? Feel free to share in our comment section! For more info and help http://curzonstaffing.com/jobseeker